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Posts Tagged ‘Yukon Gold Potatoes’


In thinking what I would make for dinner tonight, I rummaged once again through the freezer, and a couple of days ago I discovered the roast I had put away. I will be slow roasting this and will also feature roasted potatoes, carrots and parsnips to accompany this dish. Slow roasting of the meat will keep the “pink” color of the meat from side to side, and any leftovers will make great roast beef sandwiches. So let’s head off to the kitchen!

Ingredients
1 – 3 1/2# beef roast
Fresh ground salt and pepper
1 tsp each of rosemary, thyme and basil
4 cloves of garlic, peeled
Extra virgin olive oil
2 Yukon gold potatoes
A good handful of baby carrots
2 medium sized parsnips

Allow four hours for this to cook. Take the roast out of the refrigerator and let it warm up. If there is a nice layer of fat on the meat, score it.

Score the fat

While it is warming up rub with the fresh ground salt and pepper. Using a mortar and pestle, crush the herbs one at a time. Then combine in a bowl to blend evenly. Rub this on all sides of the roast. Slice the garlic into thin slices, and cut into the meat and insert the slices of garlic. Next using a slight bit of olive oil, rub this over the meat.

Rubbed with herbs and oil

Once the roast has sat out for about an hour or so, turn the heat up on your oven to 200 degrees. While this is heating up, get your pan ready, and include a roasting rack to set the roast on. When the oven is ready, place this in the oven on the 2nd rack from the bottom. Set the timer for four hours. Do not open the oven!

About an hour and a half before the roast is done get your vegetables ready. Although I really love veges cooked around the meat, for this recipe, you will have to cook these separately. I cut the potatoes into chunks, left the already peeled baby carrots whole, and the peeled the parsnips, and cut those into chunks too. Then I used about 1 tsp of rosemary, and parsley, a couple of dashes of onion powder, and 3 twists on the salt and pepper grinders. Then I used about 2 TBS of extra virgin olive oil. Using my hands I mixed it up.

Potatoes, carrots and parsnips

Set these aside. There are a couple of steps that you will need to do with the roast, so at the 50 minutes before the timer goes off, preheat the oven for the vegetables to 375 degrees. Place those in the oven. Stir these periodically during roasting.

Roasting vegetables

When the timer goes off for the meat, remove it from the oven and cover it with foil.

Before hitting it with high heat

Then turn the oven up to 500 degrees. When the oven is hot, place the roast back into the oven and cook for 5 minutes. Check the internal temperature at this point. I cooked this to medium rare and pulled this out of the oven when the temperature hit 132 degrees. Remove from the oven and cover with foil. The temperature will go up as the meat rests.

Let the roast sit

After about 10 minutes the veges should be done, and the meat ready to carve.

Slice up the meat - see the garlic?

Plate it up with your veges, and use some of the juices to pour over the meat.

Dinner is served!

Stay tuned as I will be fixing up Steve’s Baked Tilapia tomorrow!

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I am all for simple in the kitchen on a Friday night! To start off the weekend, and after a tiring work week, what could be better than a meal cooked in one pan on the stove top? Pour yourself a glass of Pinot Noir, take a sip and then let’s get started!

Ingredients
4 pork sirloin steaks
2 russet or Yukon gold potatoes
A generous handful of baby carrots
1 cup fresh mushroom sliced (I forgot to get these and will used canned instead! 😦 )
1/3 cup frozen peas
1 package of frozen artichoke hearts (or canned if you cannot get frozen)
3 TBS butter
Thyme
Fresh ground salt and pepper

Take the pork steaks and trim some of the fat from the sides of the steaks.

Trimmed pork steaks

Place the pieces of fat in a deep frying pan. Next peel the potatoes and carrots and cut them into chunks.

Cut up carrots and potatoes

These will need to be par-boiled before we use them. So get a pot of water going with these added and par-boil for 7 minutes. Before draining the water off the potatoes and carrots, place the frozen peas in the bottom of the colander. Rinse in cold water when done. While these are par-boiling let’s get the fat going. Turn the heat up on the pan to medium high. We are going to render this fat for use in our dish. Stir the fat so that all sides become a beautiful golden brown.

Browned pork fat

When this is done, remove the pieces from the pan and set aside on paper towel to drain. Then add the pork steaks and brown on both sides.

Start to brown the pork steaks

Then remove the steaks from the pan. Next, add the potatoes, carrots, mushrooms, and peas to the pan and stir to coat the vegetables.

Coat the vegetables in the pork fat

Then move the vegetables to one side of the pan and add in the steaks,

Move the vegetables to the side and add the pork

moving the vegetables around so that the meat ends up on the bottom and are covered by the vegetables. Next, use a couple of really good shakes of dried thyme leaves over all, and then follow this with a couple of grinds of salt and pepper, then dot with the butter.

Top the vege's with salt, pepper, thyme then butter

Cover the dish, turn the heat down to medium low and cook for 30 minutes.

During the cooking process - smells great!

Turn the meat over, and re-cover with the vegetables. Using a baster collect the juices and spread over the top. Cover again and cook for another 25 minutes then serve this up!

Dinner is served!

This is one of those comfort food dinners that is so good on a wet a rainy night like tonight!  Oh, and the rendered pork fat, cut it into small pieces and give this to your dog as treats!  It will add luster to the coat!

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I love a dinner that is easy to make, tastes good, and that makes the house smell so good that you just can’t wait to eat it! This is one of those dishes!

Ingredients
3 pound pork shoulder roast, boned and wrapped in a sleeve
Thyme
Onion powder
Garlic powder
Parsley flakes
Salt and pepper
Extra virgin olive oil
1 small onion, chopped
5 cloves of garlic, chopped finely
1 cup of chicken broth
14 Baby carrots, halved
2 good sized yukon gold potatoes, cut into good size chunks
1/2 pound of crimini mushrooms, sliced thickly
12 ounces of quartered artichoke hearts
1/2 cup frozen baby peas
Sonoma Gourmet roasted garlic rosemary oil
Thyme
Parsley flakes

Take the roast out of the refrigerator about an hour before cooking and rub with thyme, the onion and garlic powders, parsley flakes and some salt and pepper.

Rub the herbs and spices into the meat

After an hour,preheat the oven to 350, and heat the oil in a large skillet and brown the meat on all sides.

Brown the roast on all sides

In the same pan, add the onions and garlic and caramelize.

Caramelize the onions and garlic

Then add the broth to the pan. Make sure to scrape up the browned bits!

Add broth to the pan and scrape up all the bits stuck to the pan

Pour over the meat, cover with foil and place this in the oven.

While this is cooking get your vegetables ready. Put them in a bowl with the Sonoma Gourmet Dip and Toss, and add additional thyme and parsley flakes.

Get your vegetables ready

After the roast has cooked 30 minutes, remove it from the oven, remove the foil and toss. Place the vegetables around the roast.

Lay the vegetables around the partially cooked roast

Return the pan to the oven and cook for about an hour or until the temperature of the roast hits 140 degrees. Remove the pan from the oven, and take the roast out of the pan, set aside and cover.

Roast is removed from the oven, and the veges go back in while the roast sits

The roast will still cook for a bit so the temperature will come up to the safe temperature of at least 145 degrees. Return the pan to the oven for 15 minutes. After 15 minutes, remove the vegetables from the oven. Slice up the meat,

Slice the pork

and serve it with your roasted veges!

Dinner is served!

Try this with a Mourvedre or a Petite Sirah!

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Potatoes - Photo by Scott Bauer

There are so many different types of potatoes out there! Now more than ever! So, I wanted to know what is the potato for what use, and why? And then I thought, what a perfect topic for a blog! So, potato lovers, here is what I found on the potato and it uses…

The easy part of this blog is that potatoes fall into two different categories: One that is for baking and the other for boiling. Whew! But what if I like a raw potato? Yes, I am guilty of eating pieces of raw potato when I am preparing them, or just because I want one. So, there are three types. The raw type: Definitely a russet. Although the Yukon Golds are good raw too. So these are the two if you want to munch on one raw. The russets are actually really sweet…So, now let’s take a trip around the potato world of either baking or boiling potatoes…

Baking potatoes are the starchy variety. They are high in starch, have a coarse cork-like skin, and are fluffy when baked, and are the best for french fries. The potatoes in this category: Russet Burbank, Russet Arcadia, Norgold Russet, Goldrush, Norkotah, Long White (or White Rose or California Long White), and Idaho. This list is what I found on the internet, and the one potato not mentioned is the Kennebec. I bought these for my vegetable garden years ago, made french fries with them, and they were the best for french fries!

Boiling potatoes are waxy potatoes. They typically have smooth skins. These are good for soups, casseroles, salads, roasting or barbequing as they tend to hold their shape. Known varieties include Round White, Round Red, Yellow Potato, Red Potato, Salad Potato, La Soda, Red La Rouge, Red Pontiac, Red Nordland, Red Bliss, Yellow Finnish, Ruby Crescent, and Australian Crescent.

Now the hitch comes in with potatoes that seem to fall in the middle of the two. Yukon Golds come to mind as they are good when both boiled and when roasted. Peruvian Blue, Superior, Kennebec, and Katahdin aside from the Yukon Golds are the middle of the road potato, good for boiling or baking.

Barb, you are saying at this point, what about the fingerling potatoes? Well, we all know that they grow long and narrow, and that they resemble fingers, but how do you use these little gems? You can roast them and you can boil them, so they are the middle of the road potato too! They are typically heirloom cultivars! Some of the varieties of these potatoes are the Russian Banana, the orange skinned French, and Purple Peruvian.

How do you prepare your potatoes? Let me know!

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