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In a garden there is the rule of the 3 P’s. The first P is plant. The second is place, and the third is perception. A weed is a “plant,” that is in a “place,” where our “perception” tells us they should not be, particularly in our garden beds. But if you stop and take the time to really look at some of these unwanted plants you will find a world of beauty! Shall we take a look at some of the “weeds” in my backyard? Let’s go!

In no particular order…

Purple Striped Weedicus

Purple Striped Weedicus

A buttercup

A buttercup

A lovely pair

A lovely pair

A dandelion

A dandelion

Another dandelion

Another dandelion

Fairies in the garden

Fairies in the garden

More fairies!

More fairies!

Lavender Weedicus

Lavender Weedicus

Light Blue Weedicus

Light Blue Weedicus

Teeny, tiny blurry baby blues

Teeny, tiny blurry baby blues

White Weedicus

White Weedicus

Yellow Weedicus

Yellow Weedicus

The largest weed is the dandelion. The rest are about 1/4 to 1/16th of the size of the dandelion! Amazing isn’t it, what you can find in the yard if you look close enough? What’s in your garden?

Have a great Saturday! And, thanks for stopping by!

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Time…


For the gardener, this says it all…

So many weeds, so little time…

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What makes a plant a weed? A weed is a plant that grows where you don’t want it to. Take a look at these photos and tell me, are they weeds or flowers?

“You fight dandelions all weekend, and late Monday afternoon there they are, pert as all get out, in full and gorgeous bloom, pretty as can be, thriving as only dandelions can in the face of adversity.” – Hal Borland

A mass of flowers

“Our attitude towards plants is a singularly narrow one. If we see any immediate utility in a plant we foster it. If for any reason we find its presence undesirable or merely a matter of indifference, we may condemn it to destruction forthwith.” – Rachel Carson

Baby Blue Eyes

“But a weed is simply a plant that wants to grow where people want something else. In blaming nature, people mistake the culprit. Weeds are people’s idea, not nature’s.” – Anonymous

Clover

“What would become of the garden if the gardener treated all the weeds and slugs and birds and trespassers as he would like to be treated, if he were in their place?” – Thomas Henry Huxley

Blue Dicks

“A weed is a plant that is not only in the wrong place, but intends to stay.” – Sara Stein

Common and Bolander’s Dandelions

“A flower is an educated weed.” – Luther Burbank

Unknown and ready to bloom

“Weeds are flowers too, once you get to know them.” – A. A. Milne, Eeyore from Winnie the Pooh

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My friend Kathy told me about a thing called lasagne gardening.  She seems to have great success with this method and because of this, and the fact that my plants are just about ready to be planted I thought I would give it a go.

Here is what I have learned about this type of garden:

The garden bed is in layers.  After the first layer of newspaper, the next layer will be peat moss.  Every other layer that you choose to do is peat moss.  So, in essence, you are creating a lasagne in the garden with layers of food for the plants!  And the peat moss that you use can be considered the noodles!

Lasagne garden layers – Drawing from DesperateGardener com

What Kathy told me is so cool about this kind of garden is that there are very few weeds and whatever weeds you do get pull up really easily.  Also, that once you get your layers down, you can plant right away.  Sounds to good to be true?  Well, we shall find out.

The plan for tomorrow is to rake up what leaves I have remaining in the yard from the last fall season.  I have a bunch of newspaper courtesy of a pal from work, and Kathy has additional for me.   I will be buying 3 bags of peat moss and two bags of manure.  The rest I have here.

My plan for my layers:  Newspaper, followed by peat moss.  Next layer will be the raked up leaves followed by peat moss.  The next layer will be the manure followed by, yes, peat moss.  Then this layer will be topped with the compost that I have been accumulating for the last 5 years.   My layers, with the exception of the newspaper, which kills the weeds and relieves me of having to rototill, will all be about 1″ thick.  Once this is all together, the garden will be ready to plant.  I will hold off one more week to plant everything around Mother’s Day.  This also gives me time to acclimate the plants from the greenhouse to the natural temperatures outside.

I also read about this type of gardening from a book Kathy loaned me called “Lasagne Gardening,” written by Patricia Lanza.  One of the things that struck me from what I read in this book is that with this type of gardening, plants can be planted closer together than what is recommended on the seed packets.  OK, so I am going to give this a go, and the best part is you get to come along with me on this trip! So stay tuned for updates!

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